Chamber Series opening
Friday, September 15, 8.00 pm

Programme

Ludwig van Beethoven: Septet in E flat major, Op. 20Johann Sebastian Bach: Ricercar from The Musical Offering, arranged by Radek Baborák for two violins, viola, cello, double bass, French horn, and bass clarinetJohannes Brahms: Trio for French Horn, Violin, and Piano, Op. 40

The opening concert of the festival’s chamber series offers listeners an extraordinarily attractive programme. Music by three geniuses of the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic periods—Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms—will be rendered by an ensemble of topflight soloists including the outstanding instrumentalists and friends Denis Kozhukhin and Daishin Kashimoto, led by the series curator, hornist and conductor Radek Baborák.

Aftertalk moderated by Jiří Vejvoda with Radek Baborák, Daishin Kashimoto and Denis Kozhukhin will be held in the Dvořák hall after the concert.

  • Dress code: dark suit
  • Doors close: 19.55
  • End of concert: 22.00
  • Aftertalk

Artists

Radek Baborák

Hornist and conductor Radek Baborák ranks among the most successful Czech musicians of his generation. He studied French horn with the legendary hornist and pedagogue Bedřich Tylšar and while still a student won many international competitions. From 2003 to 2010 he held the prestigious position of principal hornist of the Berlin Philharmonic. He appears in important music festivals such as those in Salzburg, St. Petersburg, and Utrecht, and works with major orchestras of the world including the Munich Philharmonic, the Bavarian Radio Symphony, the Bamberg Symphony, and the Moscow Philharmonic, led by topflight conductors like Daniel Barenboim, Seiji Ozawa, Simon Rattle, Neeme Järvi, James Levine, and Vladimir Ashkenazy. He founded and serves as artistic director of the Baborák Ensemble, is a member of the Afflatus Quintet, and plays with the Berlin Baroque Soloists. He is also founder and director of the Czech Sinfonietta, comprising musicians of the young generation.

Radek Baborák - French horn, conductor

Daishin Kashimoto

Japanese violinist Daishin Kashimoto has been playing his instrument since early childhood. After studies in Tokyo, from the age of only seven he continued his education at the prestigious Juilliard School in New York and the College of Music in Lübeck. In 1993 he won First Place in the Yehudi Menuhin International Competition, and a year later he received honours in the violin competition in Cologne. In 1996 he triumphed in the Fritz Kreisler Violin Competition in Vienna. He appears regularly as a soloist with leading orchestras of the world such as the Boston Symphony, L’Orchestre Nationale de France, the Bavarian Radio Symphony, the Staatskapelle of Dresden, and the St. Petersburg Philharmonic. Since 2009 he has been a member of the Berlin Philharmonic, where he presently holds the position of concertmaster. He is also fond of performing chamber music, serving for example as a member of the Berlin Philharmonic Octet.

Shirley Brill

Shirley Brill studied clarinet in Israel, Germany, and the United States. At the outset of her career she performed as a soloist with the Israel Philharmonic under Zubin Mehta. Later she began appearing with other orchestras including the Hamburg Symphony, the Polish Radio Symphony, and the Munich Symphony. She collaborates with star artists like conductors Daniel Barenboim and Jeffrey Tate, and soloists Sabine Meyer, Emmanuel Pahud, and Janine Jansen. She has reaped important honours in international competitions in Switzerland, Germany, and Great Britain. Since 1999 she has been playing in a duo with pianist Jonathan Aner, making a series of acclaimed recordings and appearing in many prestigious venues including New York’s Carnegie Hall and the Tonhalle in Zürich.

Shirley Brill - clarinet

Bence Bogányi

Bence Bogányi studied bassoon in his native Hungary before continuing his education at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki and the College of Music in Berlin. He holds numerous awards including First Prize in the Bernhard Crusell International Music Competition in Finland. In 2005 he gave the world premiere of the Bassoon Concerto dedicated to him by the important Finnish composer Kalevi Aho. During the course of his career he has been principal bassoonist in the State Opera in Helsinki, the Helsinki Philharmonic, and the Berlin Radio Symphony, and since 2007 he has held that position with the Munich Philharmonic. He has already appeared as a soloist and chamber player in many countries of Europe and in Japan. With the Chantilly Quintet he has participated in concerts, workshops, and master classes in such diverse locations as Greece, Czechia, and Africa. Since 2009 he has been teaching bassoon at the College of Music in Nürnberg.

Bence Bogányi - bassoon

Denis Kozhukhin

Russian pianist Denis Kozhukhin is considered one of the most promising talents of the young generation. He attracted major attention from the public and critics in 2010 when at the age of twenty-three he won the prestigious Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels. His playing is often called a combination of extraordinary technical mastery, penetrating musical intelligence, and expressive maturity. He is a frequent guest of important musical events like the Verbier Festival and the Progetto Martha Argerich, and has already appeared as soloist in many famous venues—the Hercules Hall in Munich, Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris, and London’s Wigmore Hall. Last season he performed with the Chicago Symphony, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, the Frankfurt Radio Symphony, and many other ensembles. In 2015 he signed an exclusive recording contract with Pentatone.

Denis Kozhukhin - piano

others:

In addition to the above, other outstanding soloists will be introduced: Martina Bačová - violin, Karel Untermüller - viola, Hana Baboráková - violoncello, Michaela Fukačová - violoncello, Petr Valášek - clarinet, Štěpán Kratochvíl - double bass, Joaquín Riquelme García - viola

Rudolfinum, Dvořák Hall

The Rudolfinum is one of the most important Neo-Renaissance edifices in the Czech Republic. In its conception as a multi-purpose cultural centre it was quite unique in Europe at the time of its construction. Based on a joint design by two outstanding Czech architects, Josef Zítek and Josef Schultz, a magnificent building was erected serving for concerts, as a gallery, and as a museum. The grand opening on 7 February 1885 was attended by Crown Prince Rudolph of Austria, in whose honour the structure was named. In 1896 the very first concert of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra took place in the Rudolfinum's main concert hall, under the baton of the composer Antonín Dvořák whose name was later bestowed on the hall.