Friday, September 14, 8.00 pm
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Programme

Fryderyk Chopin: Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52Sergej Prokofjev: Piano Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 1Eugène Ysaÿe: Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin in D minor, Op. 27, No. 3Robert Schumann: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 1 in A minor, Op. 105Camille Saint-Saëns: Caprice d'après l'Etude en forme de Valse (arr. by Eugène Ysaÿe) 

Debut Day at this year’s Dvořák Prague Festival will introduce two performers who, notwithstanding their youth, have already achieved a number of noteworthy successes and are well on their way to big, international careers. The Korean violinist Bomsori Kim and the Czech pianist Lukáš Klánský have selected an attractive, varied programme, in which there will be something to suit every listener – from the romantic musical language of Frédéric Chopin to Russian modernism.

Aftertalk with both performers moderated by Jiří Vejvoda will be held in the concert hall after the concert.

  • Dress code: casual
  • Doors close: 19.55
  • End of concert: 21.30
  • Aftertalk

Artists

Bomsori Kim

The young South Korean violinist Bomsori Kim graduated from the Seoul National University, and she continued her studies at the Juilliard School in New York. She has had success at a number of international competitions, including the Tchaikovsky International Competition in Moscow, the famed Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels, and the ARD International Competition in Munich. She has already introduced herself as a soloist on several important concert stages including the Golden Hall of Vienna’s Musikverein, the Tchaikovsky Hall in Moscow, and the Hercules Hall in Munich. She appears with a number of important orchestras around the world, including the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, the Warsaw National Philharmonic, the Munich Chamber Orchestra, and the Moscow Symphony Orchestra. She has performed under the baton of such conductors as Lukasz Borowicz, Marin Alsop, and Julian Kovatchev. Last year, she issued her debut CD with violin concertos by Wieniawski and Shostakovich.

Lukáš Klánský

Lukáš Klánský is one of the most respected Czech pianists of the younger generation. A graduate of the Prague Conservatory and the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague, he is a laureate of several international competitions (incl. the International Rotary Piano Competition 2012 and the Darmstadt Chopin International Wettbewerb 2013). Besides solo recitals, he also appears playing chamber music, especially as a member of the Lobkowicz Trio, with which he won first prize at the Johannes Brahms International Competition in Pörtschach, Austria. Among his other partners on the concert stage have been the violinist Václav Hudeček, the harpist Jana Boušková, the Pražák Quartet, the Czech Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra of Pardubice, and the conductor Libor Pešek. Lukáš Klánský’s professional musical activities are not limited to the piano – he also studied conducting in the studio of Prof. Miriam Němcová and of Prof. Hynek Farkač and choral music in the class of Prof. Miroslav Košler. He is also a teacher, active at the Pilsen Conservatory and at the Grammar School and Music School of the City of Prague.

Lukáš Klánský - piano

Rudolfinum, Dvořák Hall

The Rudolfinum is one of the most important Neo-Renaissance edifices in the Czech Republic. In its conception as a multi-purpose cultural centre it was quite unique in Europe at the time of its construction. Based on a joint design by two outstanding Czech architects, Josef Zítek and Josef Schultz, a magnificent building was erected serving for concerts, as a gallery, and as a museum. The grand opening on 7 February 1885 was attended by Crown Prince Rudolph of Austria, in whose honour the structure was named. In 1896 the very first concert of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra took place in the Rudolfinum's main concert hall, under the baton of the composer Antonín Dvořák whose name was later bestowed on the hall.