Wednesday, September 19, 8.00 pm
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Programme

Franz Schubert – Franz Liszt: Swan Song, D. 957Maurice Ravel: Gaspard de la nuitModest Petrovič Musorgskij: Pictures at an Exhibition

To all of those fans who know Valentina Lisitsa mainly through YouTube, the Dvořák Prague Festival is offering a unique opportunity to experience this exceptional artist live on the stage of the Rudolfinum once again a few years after her first appearance. For her recital, the excellent Ukrainian pianist has chosen a programme offering a variety of genres, climaxing with a work that is very popular with audiences is extraordinary demanding on performers –Mussorgsky’s great Pictures at an Exhibition.

  • Dress code: dark suit
  • Doors close: 19.55
  • End of concert: 22.15

Artists

Valentina Lisitsa

The Ukrainian pianist Valentina Lisitsa represents a noteworthy phenomenon of classical music in the early 21st century: she found her way to the world’s most prestigious stages thanks to the videos that she has been putting on her YouTube channel since 2007 without any other promotion. As new recordings were added, the number of her followers grew at a breakneck pace, and the pianist soon was offered an exclusive recording contract with the Decca label, for which she has so far issued fourteen CDs. She is regarded as being most at home with the music of Sergei Rachmaninoff and Frédéric Chopin. She has been playing piano since the age of three, and she first appeared in public with a solo recital a year later. As a student, she seriously considered abandoning her piano career – her second greatest passion is chess – but music ultimately won out. She now lives in Paris and has given concerts at such venues as New York’s Carnegie Hall, the Golden Hall of Vienna’s Musikverein, and London’s Royal Albert Hall.

Rudolfinum, Dvořák Hall

The Rudolfinum is one of the most important Neo-Renaissance edifices in the Czech Republic. In its conception as a multi-purpose cultural centre it was quite unique in Europe at the time of its construction. Based on a joint design by two outstanding Czech architects, Josef Zítek and Josef Schultz, a magnificent building was erected serving for concerts, as a gallery, and as a museum. The grand opening on 7 February 1885 was attended by Crown Prince Rudolph of Austria, in whose honour the structure was named. In 1896 the very first concert of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra took place in the Rudolfinum's main concert hall, under the baton of the composer Antonín Dvořák whose name was later bestowed on the hall.