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Thursday, September 10, 8.00 pm

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Programme

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58Josef Suk: Symphony No. 1 in E major, Op. 14

“A manly, finished, powerful work, highly intellectually distinctive in its material, assured in its layout and form, confident in its mastery of the symphonic apparatus” – that is how a period critic described the Symphony No. 1 in E Major by Josef Suk. The Czech Philharmonic will be performing the work of the barely twenty-five-year-old composer under the baton of Jakub Hrůša, and this will remind us of not only the young Suk’s maturity, but also, indirectly, the music to the fairy tale Radúz and Mahulena performed at last year’s festival. The two works were composed at the same time, and there is no denying the musical features they have in common. This year, the Dvořák Prague Festival is devoting increased attention to the music of Josef Suk not only because he was Dvořák’s son-in-law, but also because Suk was a direct successor to his father-in-law’s compositional legacy. Dvořák was the first composer to create the canon of the Czech Romantic symphony, and Suk followed him in this, adding to that canon a certain emotional tremulousness, existential uncertainty, and decadent sorrow of the fin de siècle. One can hardly miss the Mahlerian echoes in Suk’s symphonic music. Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major with the superb pianist Martina Kasíka shows us the image of music ninety-five years older than Suk’s symphony, which still stood firmly on the foundations erected by Beethoven, but which also took part in starting the process of calling those foundations into question.

  • Dress code: dark suit
  • Doors close: 19.55
  • End of concert: 21.40

Artists

Czech Philharmonic

The Czech Philharmonic is the foremost Czech orchestra and has long held a place among the most esteemed representatives of Czech culture on the international scene. The beginning of its rich history is linked to the name of Antonín Dvořák, who on 4 January 1896 conducted the ensemble’s inaugural concert. Although the orchestra performs a broad range of the core international repertoire, it is sought out most often for its superb interpretations of the classics by the great Czech composers in a tradition built up by great conductors (Talich, Kubelík, Ančerl, Neumann, and Bělohlávek). In 2008 the prestigious magazine Gramophone ranked it among the twenty best orchestras of the world. One of the orchestra’s most important recent projects has recording Tchaikovsky’s complete orchestral works for the Decca Label with Semyon Bychkov conducting. Since the inception of the Dvořák Prague Festival, the Czech Philharmonic has been its resident orchestra, and since 2018 it has been a holder of the Antonín Dvořák Prize for promoting and popularising Czech classical music abroad and in the Czech Republic.

Czech Philharmonic

Jakub Hrůša

Jakub Hrůša is one of the most respected conductors of the younger generation. He studied conducting at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague, where his teachers included Jiří Bělohlávek, and he furthered his education at the Universität der Künste in Berlin. At just eighteen years of age, he won important prizes at the Prague Spring International Conducting Competition, and three years later he won the Lovro von Matačić International Conducting Competition in Zagreb. Jakub Hrůša has collaborated with most of the professional orchestras in the Czech Republic and with many orchestras around the world (London Philharmonic Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig etc.). He also devotes himself to opera. At the National Theatre in Prague, the Royal Danish Theatre in Copenhagen, and the opera festival in Glyndebourne, England, he has conducted operas including Carmen, Don Giovanni, Rusalka, The Cunning Little Vixen, and Boris Godunov. He is the current chief conductor of the Bamberg Symphony Orchestra and the principal guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic and the Philharmonia Orchestra.

Martin Kasík

The artist’s profile will be added soon.

Rudolfinum, Dvořák Hall

The Rudolfinum is one of the most important Neo-Renaissance edifices in the Czech Republic. In its conception as a multi-purpose cultural centre it was quite unique in Europe at the time of its construction. Based on a joint design by two outstanding Czech architects, Josef Zítek and Josef Schultz, a magnificent building was erected serving for concerts, as a gallery, and as a museum. The grand opening on 7 February 1885 was attended by Crown Prince Rudolph of Austria, in whose honour the structure was named. In 1896 the very first concert of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra took place in the Rudolfinum's main concert hall, under the baton of the composer Antonín Dvořák whose name was later bestowed on the hall.